Archive for the ‘Facebook’ Category

These days we all get so many friend requests, but there is no way to identify if the account is fake or a real person. So don’t worry we are going to tell you simple method to detect fake Facebook account.

How To Identify Fake Facebook Accounts?

So this is a Facebook account which named by Sarikha Agarwal. Now we need to verify if this account is real or fake, so our first step is going to the URL images.google.com and click on camera image.

So when you click on search by image you will get popup like below image.

Now go to the the requester’s profile, right click on image and click on copy image URL

Now the profile picture URL has been copied.. now again go to images.google.com Tab and paste image URL.

When you enter then you will see related images search…

Now you can better see if the profile is real or fake and as you can see the image in this case is fake. Hope this helps.

 

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The bigger and popular sites with the huge number of visitors are like hackers’ wonderland for posting scams. Especially the users on social media websites are prone to such scams that further convert to dangerous cyber attacks. Facebook has about 1.4 billion users making it potentially the most active social media site for the hackers.

These are some of the common Facebook scams that you might fall for if you haven’t already:

5) Viral Videos/ Scandals

The word “Viral” itself has become viral which makes you yearn and see the content inside. It could be anything ranging from cute puppy videos to horrendous torture videos by terrorists. More popular in these viral videos are salacious celebrity scandals which generally contain no video at all- but a link to another phishing website or require to install an update or a plugin. Once you do that, the virus is automatically installed in your system. And you know what happens next..

You will never get adult videos on any social media website, so if you happen to scroll through one on your home page, then it is definitely a Facebook scam.

4) Free Giveaways/Survey Scams

Nothing is free in this world my friend. Especially free travel tickets, and definitely not iPhones, iPads or Mac. The social media are full of such spam offers that sound too good to be true, and coaxes you as if you are the world’s luckiest person.

There are also survey scams that trick you into giving your personal information in exchange of gift vouchers or free trips. Do not fall for these Facebook scams and never forward them to your contacts either, else you would end up spamming your friends too.

3) Facebook Customization

If any link on your home page claims to change the layout, color or give you a special “Dislike Button” give any special functionality, then it is probably another Facebook scam. You can’t just change the official interface of the world’s biggest social media website by clicking a few phishing links.

These scams will either ask you to install their specific Facebook app or ask to fill a desirability form of what changes you want. Once in, they will get full access to your data or through phishing forms spread malware into your system.

If Facebook would some day want to give you customization features, then they make a grand announcement, not any hidden link. So, be alert and avoid yourself from such Facebook scams.

2) Celebrity Friend Requests/Charity

This might not happen as frequently as others but when someone falls for this Facebook scam, it hits him/her very hard. You come by a friend request of a celebrity or from so-called official  page. Then they will ask you to donate some money for the poor or the disaster struck people.

Either they will ask your credentials or directly tell you to donate through online payment services. Never trust such messages to stay safe on Facebook.

1) Who Viewed My Profile?

This is the biggest and most pervasive Facebook scam ever. Facebook has made it pretty clear that there is no way any app can tell who has visited your profile and how many times. Any link or app that claims to do so is a scam.

In these scams, you will have to give in your information and accept their terms and conditions. This scam play with the emotions of the users as most of us want to know if their secret crush or an ex-partner visits them online.

The application does tell who viewed your profile based on an algorithm, but till then you are already been infected by the app and under attack.

So, avoid all these malicious and fraudulent apps and links to be safe on the social media. With this, we end the list of biggest Facebook scams.

We will let you know if come by any more of such scams. You can also tell us, and our fossBytes community, if you happen to know some other scams.

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Yet another scam is spreading rapidly on Facebook, this time claiming to offer a free £500 Argos gift card to British shoppers.

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Free £500 Argos gift cards for Christmas
[LINK]
As it's coming up to Christmas we have decided to give away 250 £500 Argos gift cards.

The scam follows the highly prevalent ASDA gift voucher scam that has been spreading in recent hours on Facebook, and is probably masterminded by the same group of fraudsters – seeing as the modus operandi appears to be identical.

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Facebook users are tricked into sharing the link with their online friends, in the belief that they will win a prize. Of course, the more that the link is shared the more traffic is driven to a website of the scammers’ own choosing – and they earn commission every time they trick users into filling in an online form requesting personal information.

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Tens of thousands of users have already been duped – proving just how easy it is to be conned into sharing “special offer” links.

Of course, Argos has nothing at all to do with the scheme – but it’s their brand name which is being besmirched.

If you were fooled into participating in this scam remove the message from your newsfeed, so you are no longer spreading it with your online chums.

 

facebookTVAmerican singer and actress Taylor Swift has lost her scam mojo, as her fake sex tape spreading on Facebook was excluded from the top ten most successful scams, according to Bitdefender. An analysis revealed the celebrity is no longer as popular as last year, when bogus videos of her managed to spread malware on the social network.

Millions of users fall for Facebook scams every year and while Taylor Swift no longer features in the top 10, Rihanna continues to be the most tempting celebrity used as a hook for malware delivery via social media.

A free trip to Disneyland was also excluded from the list, while “guess who viewed your profile” scams keep a steady first place in the panel, comprising almost one third of the total. “Change your Facebook color” schemes now circulate internationally and claim 7.38 per cent of the total number of scams.

“Why do people still want to see who has been taking a peek at their profile, despite all security warnings? I think they believe these are legitimate apps,” states Catalin Cosoi, Chief Security Strategist at Bitdefender. “This is social engineering at its finest – a challenging mental game that pushes the right psychological buttons. The baits have changed over time, with stalkers, peekers, admirers, overly attached girlfriends and exes haunting you, but the reason this scam works is simple: human nature.”

The past couple of years have seen a proliferation of Facebook scams to parallel the social networking platform’s growth. Here are the ten most widespread in a list that also shows their proportions and targeted countries.want-to-see-who-views-your-facbeook-profile-420x500

The top 10 Facebook scams are:

1. Total profile views/visitors (Check out now who viewed your profile) – 30.20% (UK/US, Australia).
2. Change your Facebook Color/Colour – 7.38% (UK/US, Australia).
3. Rihanna sex tape with her boyfriend – 4.76% (UK/US, Australia).
4. Check my status update to get free Facebook T-shirt from Facebook – 4.21% (UK/US, Australia).
5. Say goodbye to Blue Facebook (Dites Aurevoir au Facebok BLEU) – 2.76% (France).
6. Unsealed. We are giving them away for free – 2.41% (UK/US, Australia).
7. Check if a friend has deleted you – 2.27% (UK/US, Australia).
8. See your top 10 profile peekers here! – 1.74% (UK/US, Australia).
9. Find out how to see who viewed your profile – 1.55% (Spanish-speaking countries).
10. Just changed my Facebook theme. It’s amazing – 1.50% (UK/US, Australia).

Bitdefender research also shows an increasing amount of viral video scams abusing Facebook’s like and share options. In the last year, fraudulent websites that use likejacking and YouTube have spread not only in English, but also in German, Chinese, and Italian.

 

 

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Facebook has several security measures to protect users’ account, such as a user “access token” is granted to the Facebook application (like Candy Crush Saga, Lexulous Word Game), when the user authorizes it, it provides temporary and secure access to Facebook APIs.

To make this possible, users have to ‘allow or accept’ the application request so that an app can access your account information with the required permissions.

The Access Token stores information about permissions that have been granted as well as information about when the token will expire and which app generated it. Approved Facebook apps can publish or delete content on your behalf using the access tokens, rather than your Facebook password.

Access tokens are pretty sensitive, because anyone who knows the access token of a user can access the user’s data and can perform any actions on behalf of the user, till the token is valid.

In Past years, Many Security Researchers reported various Oauth vulnerabilities to the Facebook Security team, but if the app traffic is not encrypted, you are not protected from the man-in-the middle attack and the attacker could steal your private information, using ‘access token’.

Thus, access token is enough to allow a hacker to do all that the app authorized to do. The vulnerability is not new, it has already been known for a year, but Facebook is still vulnerable to hackers and surveillance specialized agencies like the NSA.The Facebook Security team has acknowledged the vulnerability claimed by Ahmed Elsobky, a penetration tester from Egypt, “We’d actually received an earlier report from another researcher regarding this same issue. In response to that report, we’ve been working on limiting this behavior when it comes to our official apps, since they’re pre-authorized. For other apps, unfortunately, fully preventing this would mean requiring any site integrating with Facebook to use HTTPS, which simply isn’t practical for right now.“He demonstrated that ‘How to hack a Facebook account by hijacking access token with Man-in-the-Middle attack‘, as shown:

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Facebook apps must be protected from man-in-the middle attacks, and this can be done effectively by using HTTPS to encrypt any traffic that contains sensitive information or authentication credentials.
If You are a Facebook app developer, you should never send an ‘access token’ over unencrypted channels and Facebook users should only trust the encrypted apps and use “HTTPS Everywhere” Browser Extension for automated security.

TheHackerNews

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The BBC reported today

Facebook has rewarded a British man with $20,000 (£13,000) after he found a bug which could have been exploited to hack into users’ accounts.

Jack Whitton, a security researcher, discovered a flaw in the social network’s text messaging system.

Facebook thanked Mr Whitton, 22, who is part of the site’s “responsible disclosure” hall of fame.

The company, like many on the web, encourages experts to report bugs to them rather than cybercriminals.

To make it worth their while, rewards are offered of varying amounts depending on the severity of the flaw.

Such programmes are known as “bug bounties”, with similar schemes being run at the likes of Microsoft, Paypal and Google.

“Facebook’s White Hat programme is designed to catch and eradicate bugs before they cause problems,” Facebook told the BBC.

“Once again, the system worked and we thank Jack for his contribution.”

The bug, which has now been fixed, allowed Mr Whitton to spoof Facebook’s text message verification system into sending a password reset code for an account that was not his.

Using this, he could go to Facebook, reset a target user’s password, and access the account.

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Shocking I know, but sadly, yes, this is a HOAX. I am talking about this silly message that is flying around Facebook at the moment and is probably the status message of many of your friends (and maybe yours too)….

‘WARNING!!! FACEBOOK HAS CHANGED THEIR PRIVACY SETTINGS ONCE MORE!!! DUE TO THE NEW “GRAPH APP” ANYONE ON FACEBOOK (INCLUDING OTHER COUNTRIES) CAN SEE YOUR PICTURES, LIKES, AND COMMENTS. The next 2 weeks I will be posting this, and please once you have done it please post DONE! Those of you who do not keep my information from going out to the public, I will have to DELETE YOU! I want to stay PRIVATELY connected with you. I post shots of my family that I don’t want strangers to have access to!!! This happens when our friends click “like” or “comment”… automatically, their friends would see our posts too. Unfortunately, we cannot change this setting by ourselves because Facebook has configured it that way. PLEASE place your mouse over my name above (DO NOT CLICK), a window will appear, now move the mouse on “FRIENDS” (also without clicking), then down to “Settings”, click here and a list will appear. REMOVE the CHECK on “LIFE EVENTS” and “COMMENTS & LIKES”. By doing this, my activity among my friends and family will no longer become public. Now, copy and paste this on your wall. Once I see this posted on your page, I will do the same……’Facebook Spying On Your Text Messages

This is not real. This is not Facebook. But if you have posted this message as your status, don’t be ashamed, it is easy to fall for this sort of thing. The facts sound so real and the consequences so dramatic. However this is someone’s sick idea of fun & games and it’s got millions of people scrambling to change their settings this week then proceeding to unfriend people that have not done so. This is a variation of another hoax that also went viral a few months ago.

Read more of this superb post at www.thelikeffect.com