Archive for the ‘Google’ Category

These days we all get so many friend requests, but there is no way to identify if the account is fake or a real person. So don’t worry we are going to tell you simple method to detect fake Facebook account.

How To Identify Fake Facebook Accounts?

So this is a Facebook account which named by Sarikha Agarwal. Now we need to verify if this account is real or fake, so our first step is going to the URL images.google.com and click on camera image.

So when you click on search by image you will get popup like below image.

Now go to the the requester’s profile, right click on image and click on copy image URL

Now the profile picture URL has been copied.. now again go to images.google.com Tab and paste image URL.

When you enter then you will see related images search…

Now you can better see if the profile is real or fake and as you can see the image in this case is fake. Hope this helps.

 

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Image result for robots.txt

What is a robots.txt file?

Search engine through a program robot (also known as spider), automatically access the Internet page and access to web information.
You can create a plain text file, robots.txt, in your website that declares that the site does not want to be accessed by the robot so that part or all of the site’s content can not be included in the search engine, or Specifies that the search engine only includes the specified content.

Where is the robots.txt file?

The robots.txt file should be placed in the root directory of the site. For example, when a robots visit a website (such as https://www.linkedin.com ), it will first check whether the site exists https://www.linkedin.com/robots.txt this file, if the robot to find this file, it will be based on the contents of this file to determine the scope of its access.

The format of the robots.txt file

The “robots.txt” file contains one or more records, separated by blank lines (CR, CR / NL, or NL as the end), and the format of each record is as follows:

"<field>:<optionalspace><value><optionalspace>"

 

In the file can be used # for annotations, the specific use of the same practice and UNIX. The records in this file usually begin with one or more lines of User-agent, followed by a number of Disallow lines, as follows:

  • User-agent:
    The value of this item is used to describe the name of the search engine robot. In the “robots.txt” file, if there are multiple User-agent records that have multiple robots that are limited by the protocol, Say, at least one User-agent record. If the value is set to *, the protocol is valid for any robot. In the “robots.txt” file, there is only one record of “User-agent: *”.

 

  • Disallow:
    the value of the item used to describe the URL you do not want to visit, the URL can be a complete path, it can be part of any Disallow at the beginning of the URL will not be access to the robot. For example, “Disallow: /help” does not allow search engine access to /help.html and /help/index.html, and “Disallow: /help/” allows the robot to access /help.html without access to /help/index .html. Any Disallow record is empty, indicating that all parts of the site are allowed to be accessed, in the “/robots.txt” file, at least one Disallow record. If “/robots.txt” is an empty file, then for all the search engine robot, the site is open.

tv - programer

Having a solid foundation in Computer Science is important to become a successful Software Engineer. This guide is a suggested path for university students to develop their technical skills academically and non-academically through self paced hands-on learning. You may use this guide to determine courses to take, but please make sure you are taking courses required for your major in order to graduate. The online resources provided in this guide are not meant to replace courses available at your university. However, they may help supplement your learnings or provide an introduction to a topic.

Recommendations for Academic Learnings

tv-pure google

So sitting here looking out of my living room window across a very grey, cold and gloomy London I thought it might be time to spread some joy across the net.

So here are 6 fun tricks to try with Google.

1. Do a barrel roll trick:

Go to Google.com and simply type in the search box “do a barrel roll” and see the magic. The page will rotate two times.

barrel

2. Atari Breakout Trick:

Go to Google images and type “Atari Breakout”. The images will be transformed into blocks and you can play Breakout, classic arcade game of the 70’s era.

atari

3. Tilt page trick:

No this is not back to the 70’s again (that’s a pinball reference from the younger crowd). Search for “tilt” on Google and see how your page tilts a little.

tilt4. Recursion trick:

Search for “recursion” on Google and you will get stuck in an infinite loop much like recursion. Recursion means repeating. Google will show “did you mean recursion?” every time searching for recursion. Ok well that is not really fun, not like playing Breakout but at least you learn what recursion means. (Every day is a school day)

recursion

 

5. Google Gravity:

Type in “Google Gravity” in their homepage and then click on the “I’ m feeling lucky” button. It will redirect you to one of the fun projects called “Google Gravity”. It is a Chrome Experiment done by Hi-Res. See how gravity bring Google to its knees. You can even search anything.

gravity

6. Zerg Rush:

When you type “zerg rush” in Google .The ‘o’ and ‘o’ of Google appears from the top and the right of the Google page and slowly eats up the whole page leaving nothing. It’s fun to watch.

zergBonus: elgoog.im

A rotated version of Google.com, kind of google tricks. Provides you with a reversed Google site, known as Google backwards. You can also do surfing on elgoog.im, it’s fun.

elgoog

Well they cheered me up !

tv - programer

  1. ctrlq.org/screenshots – for capturing screenshots of web pages on mobile and desktops.
  2. dictation.io – online voice recognition in the browser itself.
  3. zerodollarmovies.com – find full-length movies on YouTube.
  4. screenr.com – record movies of your desktop and send them straight to YouTube.
  5. goo.gl – shorten long URLs and convert URLs into QR codes.
  6. unfurlr.come – find the original URL that’s hiding behind a short URL.
  7. qClock – find the local time of a city using a Google Map.
  8. copypastecharacter.com – copy special characters that aren’t on your keyboard.
  9. postpost.com – a better search engine for twitter.
  10. lovelycharts.com – create flowcharts, network diagrams, sitemaps, etc.
  11. iconfinder.com – the best place to find icons of all sizes.
  12. office.com – download templates, clipart and images for your Office documents.
  13. followupthen.com – the easiest way to setup email reminders.
  14. jotti.org – scan any suspicious file or email attachment for viruses.
  15. wolframalpha.com – gets answers directly without searching   – see more wolfram tips.
  16. printwhatyoulike.com – print web pages without the clutter.
  17. joliprint.com – reformats news articles and blog content as a newspaper.
  18. ctrql.org/rss – a search engine for RSS feeds.
  19. e.ggtimer.com – a simple online timer for your daily needs.
  20. coralcdn.org – if a site is down due to heavy traffic, try accessing it through coral CDN.
  21. random.org – pick random numbers, flip coins, and more.
  22. pdfescape.com – lets you can quickly edit PDFs in the browser itself.
  23. tubemogul.com – simultaneously upload videos to YouTube and other video sites.
  24. scr.im – share you email address online without worrying about spam.
  25. spypig.com – now get read receipts for your email.
  26. sizeasy.com – visualize and compare the size of any product.
  27. myfonts.com/WhatTheFont – quickly determine the font name from an image.
  28. google.com/webfonts – a good collection of open source fonts.
  29. regex.info – find data hidden in your photographs – see more EXIF tools.
  30. livestream.com – broadcast events live over the web, including your desktop screen.
  31. iwantmyname.com – helps you search domains across all TLDs.
  32. homestyler.com – design from scratch or re-model your home in 3d.
  33. join.me – share you screen with anyone over the web.
  34. onlineocr.net – recognize text from scanned PDFs – see other OCR tools.
  35. flightstats.com – Track flight status at airports worldwide.
  36. wetransfer.com – for sharing really big files online.
  37. hundredzeros.com – the site lets you download free Kindle books.
  38. polishmywriting.com – check your writing for spelling or grammatical errors.
  39. marker.to – easily highlight the important parts of a web page for sharing.
  40. typewith.me – work on the same document with multiple people.
  41. whichdateworks.com – planning an event? find a date that works for all.
  42. everytimezone.com – a less confusing view of the world time zones.
  43. gtmetrix.com – the perfect tool for measuring your site performance online.
  44. noteflight.com – print music sheets, write your own music online (review).
  45. imo.im – chat with your buddies on Skype, Facebook, Google Talk, etc. from one place.
  46. translate.google.com – translate web pages, PDFs and Office documents.
  47. kleki.com – create paintings and sketches with a wide variety of brushes.
  48. similarsites.com – discover new sites that are similar to what you like already.
  49. wordle.net – quick summarize long pieces of text with tag clouds.
  50. bubbl.us – create mind-maps, brainstorm ideas in the browser.
  51. kuler.adobe.com – get color ideas, also extract colors from photographs.
  52. liveshare.com – share your photos in an album instantly.
  53. lmgtfy.com – when your friends are too lazy to use Google on their own.
  54. midomi.com – when you need to find the name of a song.
  55. bing.com/images – automatically find perfectly-sized wallpapers for mobiles.
  56. faxzero.com – send an online fax for free – see more fax services.
  57. feedmyinbox.com – get RSS feeds as an email newsletter.
  58. ge.tt – qiuckly send a file to someone, they can even preview it before downloading.
  59. pipebytes.com – transfer files of any size without uploading to a third-party server.
  60. tinychat.com – setup a private chat room in micro-seconds.
  61. privnote.com – create text notes that will self-destruct after being read.
  62. boxoh.com – track the status of any shipment on Google Maps – alternative.
  63. chipin.com – when you need to raise funds online for an event or a cause.
  64. downforeveryoneorjustme.com – find if your favorite website is offline or not?
  65. ewhois.com – find the other websites of a person with reverse Analytics lookup.
  66. whoishostingthis.com – find the web host of any website.
  67. google.com/history – found something on Google but can’t remember it now?
  68. aviary.com/myna – an online audio editor that lets record, and remix audio clips online.
  69. disposablewebpage.com – create a temporary web page that self-destruct.
  70. urbandictionary.com – find definitions of slangs and informal words.
  71. seatguru.com – consult this site before choosing a seat for your next flight.
  72. sxc.hu – download stock images absolutely free.
  73. zoom.it – view very high-resolution images in your browser without scrolling.
  74. scribblemaps.com – create custom Google Maps easily.
  75. alertful.com – quickly setup email reminders for important events.
  76. picmonkey.com – Picnik is offline but PicMonkey is an even better image editor.
  77. formspring.me – you can ask or answer personal questions here.
  78. sumopaint.com – an excellent layer-based online image editor.
  79. snopes.com – find if that email offer you received is real or just another scam.
  80. typingweb.com – master touch-typing with these practice sessions.
  81. mailvu.com – send video emails to anyone using your web cam.
  82. timerime.com – create timelines with audio, video and images.
  83. stupeflix.com – make a movie out of your images, audio and video clips.
  84. safeweb.norton.com – check the trust level of any website.
  85. teuxdeux.com – a beautiful to-do app that looks like your paper dairy.
  86. deadurl.com – you’ll need this when your bookmarked web pages are deleted.
  87. minutes.io – quickly capture effective notes during meetings.
  88. youtube.com/leanback – Watch YouTube channels in TV mode.
  89. youtube.com/disco – quickly create a video playlist of your favorite artist.
  90. talltweets.com – Send tweets longer than 140 characters.
  91. pancake.io – create a free and simple website using your Dropbox account.
  92. builtwith.com – find the technology stack of any website.
  93. woorank.com – research a website from the SEO perspective.
  94. mixlr.com – broadcast live audio over the web.
  95. radbox.me – bookmark online videos and watch them later (review).
  96. tagmydoc.com – add QR codes to your documents and presentations (review).
  97. notes.io – the easiest way to write short text notes in the browser.
  98. ctrlq.org/html-mail – send rich-text mails to anyone, anonymously.
  99. fiverr.com – hire people to do little things for $5.
  100. otixo.com – easily manage your online files on Dropbox, Google Docs, etc.

TV_Android

About 460 of the top 500 Android applications create a security or privacy risk when downloaded to Android devices, according to new research. And that’s largely because of a lack of user education and the fact that mobile users don’t mind sharing personal information for free apps in return.

MetaIntell, a vendor that specializes in cloud-based mobile risk management (MRM), set about testing the top apps in a range of stores, including Amazon, CNET, GETJAR and the official Google Play store. It found that more than 92% of the applications it tested used non-secure communication protocols, while 60% communicate with domains that are blacklisted by a reputation service.

Additional risks included developer reputation, content vulnerabilities and 20% of the apps tested had the ability to load external applications either locally or remotely – all without the express consent or knowledge of the user.

Digging deeper into the data, MetaIntell rated the risks so high on many applications that 42% of them should not be allowed onto any consumer or enterprise-owned device.

These results are from an analysis of the apps that people download the most – suggesting that much more user education is necessary when it comes to mobile use.

“What most people do not fully appreciate are the risks associated with downloading apps from the million-plus Android applications available in app stores,” the company explained in the research. “Most users assume that applications are trusted if they are offered in an official app market. App stores typically make no guarantee about the trustworthiness of the products they offer. Most often, applications are developed and hosted in the apps markets with no risk assessment.”

The reality is, almost any application can become the source of serious threats that can affect both the device and the intranets to which that device connects, which can have serious ramifications in an enterprise setting. Users should approach app downloads with this in mind – especially corporate users.

“Access to personal data is what makes mobile applications uniquely useful and relevant to users,” said Chris Hazelton, research director for mobile and wireless at industry analysts 451 Research, in a statement. “In exchange for free apps, consumers are willing to share personal data with third party developers. Companies cannot afford to do this, and must control access to data on mobile devices – creating a real need for greater transparency and control of the apps that are available to employees from public app stores.”

So how can mobile device users and enterprises protect themselves from risky mobile applications? By not downloading applications that carry risk, of course – and that means being vigilant about reading the terms and conditions of apps and understanding what one is agreeing to when downloading. “Threats occur where risk conditions exist. Eliminate the risk and avoid the threat,” said Kevin Mullenex, CEO of MetaIntell.

Unfortunately, that will be easier said than done.

 

Source: infosecurity-magazine

tv crime2
So this post has come about by one of my friends posting the below video from LiveLeak on Facebook which is quite terrifying if you are a parent. But have no fear I will tell you how to stop people from tracking you or your child.

video pic

Some cameras, smartphones and tablets add location data to each picture you take. This means that anyone who wants to can see the exact longitude and latitude of the image. Geotagging data is wonderful for finding out where a picture was taken. However, it may not be obvious if you don’t know how to view it. For those who want to find out whether photos have been geotagged before posting them online, it is important to know how to check. The process is simple and helps to have better control over your pictures.

Is Your Camera Geotagging

Before viewing or checking for location data, you should know whether your camera is geotagging your pictures. Any camera you use must have GPS enabled in order for geotagging to occur. This is most common in smartphones, but some digital cameras have this capability as well. Without this feature, no location data is embedded in images. Remember that this data, called EXIF data, is invisible unless you know how to look for it.

What You Need

To view EXIF data, all you need is a web browser. There is no need to download extra software on your computer. Navigate to Jeffrey’s EXIF Viewer. Unlike many other tools available, this one keeps it simple and focuses on location information so you don’t have to sort through a lot of unnecessary data. Another benefit is the wide variety of file types that are supported. You would have to have some extremely rare file types for this tool not to work for you.

Using Jeffrey’s EXIF Viewer

This tool provides two different options for viewing geotagged images. The first allows you to view information from images already online. The second allows you to check images before they are posted online.

For online images, open the picture in your browser. Copy the URL of the image. The quick way is to highlight the URL and press Ctrl + C. Open the browser window with Jeffrey’s EXIF Viewer. Paste (Ctrl + V) the URL into the Image URL box. Press View Image At URL. You will see a few details about the camera, the date the image was taken and finally the location data along with a map.

For images stored on your computer, press Browse beside the Local Image File box. Choose the file in question and press View Image From File. You will see the same data the online option.

Testing it

Here is a picture I took in the summer of an exhibition about the activist group Anonymous

Post Picture

Now right click on the image and select ‘Copy Link Address’

Navigate to http://regex.info/exif.cgi and pastie the link into the URL Image box

Hit ‘View Image at URL’ and there you go.

location

Although the image on the page is a bit small, you can see tones of data including an arrow pointing to the Museum of London in the UK which is correct.

Now just imagine if this was a picture of your child on a social media site and the person viewing wanted to track them or their school down. Have no fear the following steps will tell you how to stop this from happening.

What can you do to protect yourself from stalkers and other bad guys using geotags to track you down?

Consider turning off location services on some location sharing apps

Find the location sharing settings on your smartphone and turn off the ones that you think might pose a personal safety risk. You can always turn them back on later if you want to.

Most smartphones will let you turn off location sharing for individual apps as an alternative to turning them off globally.

There are some apps such as ‘Find My iPhone’ that you won’t want to disable location sharing on. If you do disable location sharing on apps like ‘Find My iPhone’, then your phone won’t be able to relay its position and you won’t be able to find it using the ‘Find My iPhone’ service should it get lost or stolen.

Remove geotags from your digital photos

If you want to remove geotag information from your image files then you can use an app such asdeGeo (iPhone) or Photo Privacy Editor (Android) to remove the geotag info from your photos.

Consider turning off the location sharing setting of your phone’s camera app as well so that the GPS info does not get recorded as part of the picture’s meta data, this will save you the hassle of having to strip out the location data later on.

How do I turn off Geotaging on my Smart phone

Android 4.2 phones

  1. Start camera application
  2. Hit the Settings button
  3. Scroll down and find the GPS Tag option and turn it off

In older versions, the option may be called “Store Location,” but is it essentially the same process.

BlackBerry 6.0 and 7.0

RIM suggests through the online documentation that disabling geotagging be done on BlackBerry Enterprise Server,  which would work from an admin’s point of view if an agency uses BES. If not, to turn the setting off on an individual BlackBerry  phone:

  1. Open Camera
  2. Set the Location icon to “Disabled”

For some earlier versions, hit the Menu and Option buttons before changing the setting.

iPhone 4 and 5

  1. Go to Settings
  2. Select General
  3. Select Location Services
  4. Set Camera to “Off”

For older versions users can’t really turn off geotagging for the camera without disabling it for all applications. But location warnings can be set to go off when an application is using them.

Windows Phone 7 and 8

  1. Go to Settings
  2. Navigate to Applications
  3. Scroll down to Pictures & Camera
  4. Set “include location (GPS) info in Pictures you take” to “Off”

I hope this has put your mind at ease, but if you do have any question please contact me. Also please share this on social media sites and on friends pages.