Archive for the ‘Google’ Category

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As announced on May 15, 2013, games inside plus.google.com will be retired on June 30, 2013. If you would like to continue playing a particular game, contact the game’s developer to find out if there’s a new destination site for the game. Some of the game pages on plus.google.com/games have a link to an alternative site where you can continue to play the game.

What about payments I’ve made in the game?

Some games will be migrating data to an alternative destination site where you can continue to use your unused payments. Other games are offering a grace period in which you can use any available credits before the game is shutdown. Contact the game developer for further information.

What is Google Play game services?

Google Play game services is a cross-platform game service and SDK on Android, iOS, and the web, enabling a rich set of in-game user experiences for cross screen gaming. Games that use game services can bring you many great experiences, including:

  • Achievements: record and celebrate your greatest gaming accomplishments.
  • Social & Public Leaderboards: Google+ powered leaderboards report your in-game scores between friends and across the world.
  • Cloud save: games automatically store your game saves, progress and preferences for Android, iOS, and web.
  • Real-time multi-player: connect up to 4 players simultaneously for cooperative and competitive game play on Android.

To find great titles using Play game services, visit the Google Play Store.

tv-pure google

An “inside source” has told Digital Trends that Google and WhatsApp are close to making a deal. The source says that Google want to buy the very successful WhatsApp multi-platform messaging service but the WhatsApp team are “playing hardball” and trying to squeeze more cash out of the Mountain View search giant.

WhatsApp is available for all the major, and minor, mobile platforms including Android, iOS, Windows Phone and BlackBerry. If Google could acquire it then build it into its existing services to unify its messaging options it could achieve a big user boost. WhatsApp is extremely popular; it’s the most popular mobile app in over 100 countries and on New Year’s Eve 2012 a record 18 billion WhatsApp messages were sent and received by users.

Will Google make it free but ad sponsored?

WhatsApp’s monetization scheme is different to Google’s ads and sponsored search approach. The popular messaging app is currently supported by a $0.99 yearly fee and also generates revenue through partnerships with mobile telcos who offer WhatsApp usage add-ons to mobile tariffs. It will be interesting to see if a Google acquisition would change this model drastically.

Facebook has recently initiated a push into mobile with Facebook Home. Mr Zuckerberg also realises the importance of messaging to engage users and the Chat Heads application is probably the most important part of the launcher/suite after the Facebook Cover Feed home screen itself. Incidentally both Facebook and Google have reportedly approached WhatsApp before, late in 2012.

Google has been rumoured to be getting ready to launch a messaging service called Babel to tie together all its communications services into a unified hub. Could a WhatsApp acquisition and integration be an almost off-the-peg solution with the advantage of a huge existing user base? We should find out more about these plans by the time Google I/O takes place in May or earlier if the deal is sealed.

tv-pure googleHappy first of April ~ April Fools’ Day is celebrated in many countries on April 1 every year. Sometimes referred to as All Fools’ Day, April 1 is not a national holiday, but is widely recognized and celebrated as a day when people play practical jokes and hoaxes on each other.

While spending my Monday morning investigating the latest news and comical images on Reddit and Google, I came across this ingenious post for Google’s new scentsation in search:

google scent

The new scentsation in search

  • Coming to your senses: go beyond type, talk, and touch for a new notation of sensation.
  • Your internet sommelier: expertly curated Knowledge Panels pair images, descriptions, and aromas.
  • Take a whiff: the Google Aromabase – 15M+ scentibytes.
  • Don’t ask, don’t smell: For when you’re wary of your query – SafeSearch included.

Have a look at the full page in all it’s glory: Google Nose

Rovio’s latest game, Bad Piggies, is now available via Google Play and the App Store, and as a PC and Mac download, but it has not yet made its way to the Chrome Web Store. These pigs can indeed fly – “Bad Piggies,” the spinoff to the monster hit game “Angry Birds,” set a new record by soaring to the top of the charts just three hours after release.

Scammers have quickly taken advantage of this, introducing bogus versions of Bad Piggies into the Chrome Web Store that exist primarily to serve up in-browser advertisements thanks to a few plug-in permissions.
Barracuda Networks’ lab today discovered a knock-off of the new and wildly popular “Bad Piggies” game which includes a phishing plug-in that may have injected an aggressive adware program into more than 82,000 Chrome browsers.
The lack of a free online version for Bad Piggies left space for others to capitalize on the instant success of the game. Just days after the game launched, Jason Ding, a research scientist from Barracuda Networks, found seven free versions of the games in the Google Chrome web store.
Jason Ding notes that all of these games are being distributed by the same site: playook.info. After installation, the games insert their own advertisements into popular websites. Barracuda found that after deploying the games in a test environment, they inserted advertising from playook.com into sites like Myspace, eBay, IMDB, Yahoo and MSN among dozens of other sites on the Chrome browser.
If you have already installed, uninstall them immediately and change your passwords on other websites if possible,” Barracuda said. The firm also warned users to be wary of plugins that requires a lot of suspicious permissions.

The Google engineer who wrote a program that collected personal data from wi-fi networks told at least two other colleagues, a report has revealed.

Google released the full investigation conducted by the US Federal Communications Commission (FCC).
It said senior staff on the Street View team were unaware of the plans.
The company was fined $25,000 (£15,300) earlier this month for impeding the FCC’s investigation, but was ruled to not have broken the law.

The report came two weeks after a heavily redacted version was released by the FCC at the time of the original fine.
It detailed how one Google engineer, referred to only as “Engineer Doe”, produced a computer program capable of collecting data from people’s unsecured home wireless networks.

The data gathered included contents of some emails and web browsing history. ‘Collect, store and review’
The collection took place while Google was photographing areas in its Street View car between 2008 and 2010.
“Engineer Doe specifically told two engineers working on the project, including a senior manager, about collecting payload data,” the agency said in its report.
“Engineer Doe intended to collect, store and review payload data for possible use in other Google projects.”

However, the investigation added that other senior managers on the Street View team were unaware of Engineer Doe’s actions.
Google said it wanted to now “put the matter behind us”.
“We decided to voluntarily make the entire document available except for the names of individuals,” the company said.
“While we disagree with some of the statements made in the document, we agree with the FCC’s conclusion that we did not break the law.”

Source: www.bbc.com

Last summer, Google took its Street View camerasto the Amazon, looking to capture the same 360-degree vistas that have made the technology so useful in cities all over the world. Yesterday, the project went live. There goes the rest of your week.

You can now wander around the Amazonian jungle — exploring its rivers, forests, and even remote villages — all from your computer. Says Google:

Take a virtual boat ride down the main section of the Rio Negro, and float up into the smaller tributaries where the forest is flooded. Stroll along the paths of Tumbira, the largest community in the Reserve, or visit some of the other communities who invited us to share their lives and cultures. Enjoy a hike along an Amazon forest trail and see where Brazil nuts are harvested. You can even see a forest critter if you look hard enough!

Click through to the Amazon section of the Street View Gallery to get an idea of what’s available to explore, or start up your copy of Google Earth and get up close and personal with South America’s Amazon Basin. (Looks like you’ll need Google Earth version 6 to explore.)

When Google Public DNS launched in late 2009, it was only ever supposed to be an experiment. But yesterday, Google announced that it’s now the most popular public DNS in the world, handling over 70 billion requests per day.

What is DNS? LEARN HERE

To use Google engineer Jeremy K. Chen’s own simile, as expressed in the official blog entry, DNS – short for Domain Name System – is like the Internet’s phone book. When you put a URL into the browser, the DNS service looks it up and matches it to an IP address. Google Public DNS aims to be the most complete, fastest, and most secure listing of its kind out there for users all over the world.

In fact, Chen writes that 70% of Google Public DNS traffic comes from outside the US, thanks to existing nodes in North and South America, bolstered support in Europe, and all-new nodes for regions like Japan, Australia, India and Nigeria.

Of course, Google critics are wondering what good could come of the search giant having access to even more user data – in this case, a log of every single website that Google Public DNS visitors go to, all day, every day.

Now, Google says that it “never blocks, filters, or redirects users, unlike some open resolvers and ISPs,” but, well, here’s InformationWeek’s rock-solid summary of its privacy policy:

Google also maintains a separate privacy policy for Google Public DNS. The company says it maintains two sets of server logs related to the service: temporary and permanent. The temporary logs contain user IP addresses and those are deleted in 24 to 48 hours (barring a court order to the contrary). The permanent logs, which contain city-level location data but nothing personally identifiable, are retained for at least two weeks. A small random sample taken from the permanent logs is kept indefinitely.

It’s still unclear if Google Public DNS’ privacy policy will be streamlined into Google’s streamlined, unified document that’s going live on March 1st, but regardless, it seems extremely likely that Google will stick to its guns as far as not sharing that data with anyone else. And on a slight tangent, I highly doubt that we’ll see Google Public DNS added to that unified privacy policy, given the comparatively unique legal precautions it’s already caused Google to take.

In the final analysis, the measure of how okay you should be with Google Public DNS and its privacy implications depends on whether or not you feel like Google is, in fact, evil. In the meanwhile, Google’s holding the line that it protects user privacy at all costs.

Thanks to

www.howstuffworks.com

www.zdnet.co.uk

en.wikipedia.org