Posts Tagged ‘cheat sheet’

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When working on an app or a code, you may often need some reference material that’s where cheatsheets become very useful.

Here we present to you with an A-Z of cheatsheets that are relevant to programmers and developers. It doesn’t cover all languages or databases, but you’ll find most of what you need. If there’s anything missing, feel free to let us know so we can do better.

1. Asynchronous JavaScript And XML (AJAX): This is a group of interrelated web development techniques that are used to create asynchronous web applications on the client side.

2. Apache: If you’re using the Apache HTTP server then this cheat sheet is just what you would need in front of you.

3. Apache Ant: This java library and command line tool is used for automating software build processes.

4. Apache Cassandra: The open source distributed database management system is often the first pick when scalability is a concern.

5. American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII): The most common character encoding scheme.

6. Berkeley DB: Oracle’s Berkeley DB is a fast and reliable option chosen by many developers.

7. Blueprint: This is a cheatsheet on the popular CSS framework/

8. C: In many ways it is the father of some of the most popular programming languages.

9. C#: A cheatsheet on C# never goes to waste. Most programmers learn the language and a cheatsheet always helps.

10. C++: One of the most useful programming languages ever. It is a must learn language for programmers.

11. Calculus and Analysis: Programmers and developers often need to have a good grasp on calculus and analysis in order to build certain types of apps.

12. Clojure: One of the most popular languages running on the Java Virtual Machine.

13. CSS: Cascading Style Sheets along with HTML is the language of the internet.

14. Debian: A cheatsheet on one of the most popular Linux-based distributions.

15. Django: Written in Python, this is an open source web application framework used by many.

16. DOM – Document Object Model: This is the convention used for interacting with objects in XHTML, XML and HTML.

17. Drupal: The open source content management system is highly popular amongst developers/

18. Eclipse: One of the most popular IDEs, used almost everywhere today.

19. Fedora: One of the big daddies from amongst the Linux-based distributions.

20. Firebug: The web development add-on for Mozilla’s Firefox has turned quite a few heads.

21. Git: It doesn’t matter whether you support open source or not, Git needs no introduction.

22. Groovy: This is another programming language that runs on the Java Virtual Machine.

23. Hadoop: Big Data is the future and hence, so is Hadoop.

24. Haskell: This is an open source functional programming language.

25. HTML: Use the Hypertext Markup Language to create your own website.

26. Java: The inescapable language for programmers and developers.

27. JavaScript: The scripting language for the web.

28. jQuery: A feature rich JavaScript library.

29. Linux: Command line tips that Linux users will find useful.

30. Mac OS X: This is a keyboard cheatsheets for Apple’s Mac OS X users.

31. Mathematica: The Wolfram Mathematica is considered to be a very powerful system.

32. MATLAB: This is a high-level technical computing language and interactive environment.

33. MySQL: Some have been losing fait over MySQL, but the database still goes strong.

34. NMAP: You hackers know what this is don’t you?

35. Node.js: This is the pick of the lot for building scalable web

36. Oracle: This is a reference cheat sheet for Oracle’s SQL.

37. Perl: The popular programming language is used in a variety of places.

38. PHP: Not much needs to be said about PHP.

39. PostgreSQL: This is often used as an alternative for MySQL.

40. Python: One of the most popular programming languages available today. It is used in everything from game programming to hacking.

41. Ruby: Another popular programming platform used by many across the globe.

42. Ruby on Rails: This is an open source framework that runs on Ruby.

43. Scala: This is an object-functional programming and scripting language running on the JVM.

44. Shell script

45. SQL – Structured Query Language: The programming language used to manage data stored in relational database systems.

46. SQLite: This is the relational database management system that is held in a C programming library.

47. Ubuntu: Linux for humans. It may be so, but a cheatsheet is still useful.

48. Unicode: This is the standard for encoding in the world of computers.

49. Unix: A cheatsheet for working on the Unix command line.

50. WordPress: The content management system has grown in popularity over time.

51. XHTML: This is an XML markup language. It stands for Extensible HTML.

52. XML: XML stands for Extensible Markup Language and is used by many.

53. .NET: This framework from Microsoft runs primarily on Windows and there is a debate about whether it is open source or not.

 

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Download the PDF cheat sheet >Caintech.co.uk Windows Shortcuts You Should All Know To Save Time

 

Windows Explorer Keyboard Shortcuts

* END (Display the bottom of the active window)

* HOME (Display the top of the active window)

* NUM LOCK+Asterisk sign (*) (Display all of the subfolders that are under the selected folder)

* NUM LOCK+Plus sign (+) (Display the contents of the selected folder)

* NUM LOCK+Minus sign (-) (Collapse the selected folder)

* LEFT ARROW (Collapse the current selection if it is expanded, or select the parent folder)

* RIGHT ARROW (Display the current selection if it is collapsed, or select the first subfolder)

 

Shortcut Keys for Character Map

* After you double-click a character on the grid of characters, you can move through the grid by using the keyboard shortcuts:

* RIGHT ARROW (Move to the right or to the beginning of the next line)

* LEFT ARROW (Move to the left or to the end of the previous line)

* UP ARROW (Move up one row)

* DOWN ARROW (Move down one row)

* PAGE UP (Move up one screen at a time)

* PAGE DOWN (Move down one screen at a time)

* HOME (Move to the beginning of the line)

* END (Move to the end of the line)

* CTRL+HOME (Move to the first character)

* CTRL+END (Move to the last character)

* SPACEBAR (Switch between Enlarged and Nor mal mode when a character is selected)

 

Microsoft Management Console (MMC) Main Window Keyboard Shortcuts

* CTRL+O (Open a saved console)

* CTRL+N (Open a new console)

* CTRL+S (Save the open console)

* CTRL+M (Add or remove a console item)

* CTRL+W (Open a new window)

* F5 key (Update the content of all console windows)

* ALT+SPACEBAR (Display the MMC window menu)

* ALT+F4 (Close the console)

* ALT+A (Display the Action menu)

* ALT+V (Display the View menu)

* ALT+F (Display the File menu)

* ALT+O (Display the Favourites menu)

 

MMC Console Window Keyboard Shortcuts

* CTRL+P (Print the current page or active pane)

* ALT+Minus sign (-) (Display the window menu for the active console window)

* SHIFT+F10 (Display the Action shortcut menu for the selected item)

* F1 key (Open the Help topic, if any, for the selected item)

* F5 key (Update the content of all console windows)

* CTRL+F10 (Maximize the active console window)

* CTRL+F5 (Restore the active console window)

* ALT+ENTER (Display the Properties dialog box, if any, for the selected item)

* F2 key (Rename the selected item)

* CTRL+F4 (Close the active console window. When a console has only one console window, this shortcut closes the console)

 

Remote Desktop Connection Navigation

* CTRL+ALT+END (Open the Microsoft Windows NT Security dialog box)

* ALT+PAGE UP (Switch between programs from left to right)

* ALT+PAGE DOWN (Switch between programs from right to left)

* ALT+INSERT (Cycle through the programs in most recently used order)

* ALT+HOME (Display the Start menu)

* CTRL+ALT+BREAK (Switch the client computer between a window and a full screen)

* ALT+DELETE (Display the Windows menu)

* CTRL+ALT+Minus sign (-) (Place a snapshot of the active window in the client on the Terminal server clipboard and provide the same functionality as pressing PRINT SCREEN on a local computer.)

* CTRL+ALT+Plus sign (+) (Place a snapshot of the entire client window area on the Terminal server clipboard and provide the same functionality as pressing ALT+PRINT SCREEN on a local computer.)

 

Internet Explorer navigation

* CTRL+B (Open the Organize Favourites dialog box)

* CTRL+E (Open the Search bar)

* CTRL+F (Start the Find utility)

* CTRL+H (Open the History bar)

* CTRL+I (Open the Favourites bar)

* CTRL+L (Open the Open dialog box)

* CTRL+N (Start another instance of the browser with the same Web address)

* CTRL+O (Open the Open dialog box, the same as CTRL+L)

* CTRL+P (Open the Print dialog box)

* CTRL+R (Update the current Web page)

* CTRL+W (Close the current window)

Shortcut Cheat Sheets

Posted: 16/06/2010 in Cheat sheets
Tags:

Google Search Tips & Shorctuts
Windows Shortcuts
Mac OS X Shortcuts
Gmail Shortcuts
Firefox Shortcuts (Windows)
Firefox Shortcuts (Mac)
Google Reader Shortcuts
One Page Linux Manual
Linux Command Line Cheat Sheet
Mozilla Thunderbird Cheat Sheet
Internet Explorer Shortcuts

Cheat sheet is a concise set of notes used for quick reference. Cheat sheets will contain most of the shortcuts needed to program faster. And it is meant for newbie users who can’t remember the shortcuts or commands.

In this article , I have collected some of the useful cheat sheets available for MAC OS. These cheat sheets will definitely help you either if you are new to MAC or if you are shifting from Windows to MAC. These cheat Sheets also covers some of the useful keyboard shortcuts and things which you will be using in MAC daily.

You may think that one cheat sheet is just enough , but I feel that some cheat sheets may miss some points so its better to look through all of them and then choose the top 2-5 you think will help you the most. After that you can Print them out and hang them on the wall around your desk for quick reference.

My MAC cheat Sheet

Whether your Mac asks you for certain information or you’re seeking help from Apple or an Apple Authorized Service Provider (AASP), there may come a time when you need to have access to your serial number, hardware configuration, passwords, email server or internet access information. And then you discover that you’ve either forgotten or misplaced this information. If you forget it, don’t worry, pull out your Mac Cheat Sheet instead.

My Mac Cheat Sheet

MAC 101 – beginner’s guide

If you’re new to computers or simply need a refresher course on how to get the most out of your Mac, then MAC 101 cheat sheet is for you.

MAC 101 - beginner's guide

Macs All-in-One For Dummies

Macs come in all shapes and sizes, but you turn all of them on and off, and do things with the keyboard and mouse (or trackpad, if yours is a MacBook) the same way. Macintosh OS X Snow Leopard, Apple’s latest version of the Mac operating system, has all the familiar boxes, windows, and mouse pointers as its predecessors. This Cheat Sheet of timesaving keyboard shortcuts, mouse actions, Mac-related Web sites, and definitions can help you get the most from your Mac right away.

Macs All-in-One For Dummies

Reference for EVERY Character Key on a Mac

Ever wanted to type the copyright icon, or do an accent over an A without having to resort to some character palette? We have, and it takes time and is an effort. So we put together a series of help sheets that reference all of the characters that aren’t listed on your keyboard, along with their shortcut keys to make your life easier.

Reference for EVERY Character Key on a Mac

Switch 101 – Apple MAC cheat sheet

If you’re a PC user who has just switched to the Mac and want to find out how to adapt your old working habits to the Mac OS, you’ve come to the right place. Whether you want to learn how to get around and access everything on your Mac; find out how to move your old PC files to the Mac OS environment; figure out how to connect your printer, iPod, digital camera, or other device; learn how to do those tasks you did on a PC on a Mac; learn how to use the software that came with your Mac; or even find out what to do when things don’t go as planned; Switch 101 has got all the answers.

My First MAC guide

Leopard Cheat Sheet

My First MAC guide

MAC OS X keyboard Cheat Sheet

My First MAC guide

My First MAC guide

Below you’ll find the My First Mac guide on how to use your new Mac when all you know is Windows. Of course this topic can go deep and take months or even years of training, so we will stick to the top dozen or so issues that new Mac users run into that makes them want to throw their Mac through the window.

My First MAC guide

MAC OS X cheat sheet

MAC OS X cheat sheet

Avid Support – MAC cheat Sheet

It is intended to help properly configure and troubleshoot Mac editing systems – both PowerPC and Intelbased. Included are some tips and tricks to maximize performance and stability of your system. Follow the tips in the document and the initial installation and configuration will be very simple.

My First MAC guide

MAC OS cheat sheet

MAC OS X cheat sheet

Mac OS X Transition Cheat Sheet

MAC OS X cheat sheet

MS EXCEL MAC CHEAT SHEET

My First MAC guide

DREAMWEAVER MAC CHEAT SHEET

My First MAC guide

Mac OS Quick Reference, Apple Mac OS X Tiger

Mac OS Quick Reference, Apple Mac OS X Tiger

Mac OS X Mail email settings Cheat Sheet

You can print (or copy and paste to a text document) and fill out the following “cheat sheet” to record your email
provider’s settings. This sheet can make it easier for you to configure Mail in Mac OS X, or if you contact your
provider.

My First MAC guide

I hope that this list of Cheat sheets will definitely help you in handling MAC. If you have came across any good cheat sheet for MAC then do let me know.