Posts Tagged ‘Geek’

tv-trekAt a convention full of nerds, a new mum got up and asked former “Star Trek: The Next Generation” cast member Wil Wheaton to offer her infant daughter some advice. He obliged. With SHOWMANSHIP. At 1:40, he just nails it.

 

 

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Caintech.co.uk

We all have a geek friend that has tried to teach themselves how to read barcodes and the below quote will give them a lot of joy. Also if you have a geeky boy/girlfriend pick one out and email it to them, they will love it

Feel free to post your own geek quotes below.

 

#1. Roses are #FF0000, Violets are #0000FF. All my base Are belong to you  — someone on SlashDot

#2. There is no place like 127.0.0.1

#3. Girls are like Internet Domain names, the ones I like are already taken

#4. Programming today is a race between software engineers striving to build bigger and better idiot-proof programs, and the Universe trying to produce bigger and better idiots. So far, the Universe is winning

#5. Computers are incredibly fast, accurate, and stupid; humans are incredibly slow, inaccurate and brilliant; together they are powerful beyond imagination. — Albert Einstein

#6. There are 10 types of people in the world: Those who understand binary and those who don’t.

#7. If at first you don’t succeed, call it version 1.0

#8. 1f u c4n r34d th1s u r34lly n33d t0 g37 l41d

#9. I’m not anti-social; I’m just not user friendly

#10. I would love to change the world, but they won’t give me the source code

#11. My Software never has bugs. It just develops random features.

#12. The speed of sound is defined by the distance from door to computer divided by the time interval needed to close the media player and pull up your pants when your mom shouts “OH MY GOD WHAT ARE YOU DOING!!!

#13. The glass is neither half-full nor half-empty: it’s twice as big as it needs to be.

#14. Passwords are like underwear. You shouldn’t leave them out where people can see them. You should change them regularly. And you shouldn’t loan them out to strangers

#15. Enter any 11-digit prime number to continue…

#16. A Life? Cool! Where can I download one of those?

#17. I spent a minute looking at my own code by accident. I was thinking “What the hell is this guy doing?”

#18. Concept: On the keyboard of life, always keep one finger on the escape button.

#19. Alert! User Error. Please replace user and press any key to continue

#20. If builders built buildings the way programmers wrote programs, then the first woodpecker that came along would destroy civilization. — Weinberg’s Second Law

Computational Engineers at the University of Southampton have built a supercomputer from 64 Raspberry Pi computers and Lego.

The machine, named “Iridis-Pi” after the University’s Iridis supercomputer, runs off a single 13 Amp mains socket and uses MPI (Message Passing Interface) to communicate between nodes using Ethernet.

The whole system cost under £2,500 (excluding switches) and has a total of 64 processors and 1Tb of memory (16Gb SD cards for each Raspberry Pi). Professor Cox uses the free plug-in ‘Python Tools for Visual Studio’ to develop code for the Raspberry Pi.

“The team wants to see this low-cost system as a starting point to inspire and enable students to apply high-performance computing and data handling to tackle complex engineering and scientific challenges as part of our on-going outreach activities,” says prof. James Cox.

If you want to build a Raspberry Pi Supercomputer yourself, see here.

 

http://www.raspberrypi.org

What is a Raspberry Pi?

 

 

So last week I finally got a Raspberry Pi motherboard and I have to say I am very impressed. I have a distro of Debian running at the moment called Raspbian “wheezy” which runs like a dream.

The only thing I was worried about is that the board comes with no case, this is of course to keep the price at £25 which is amazing in its self. So to give the board a little protection I thought I’d buy/make a case for it, and by the title of this post you can guess I found one and it is FREE \o/

The Punnet – a card case for you to print (for free)

https://i1.wp.com/www.raspberrypi.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/Punnet.jpg

It’s any easy to create card case, its just up to you what card you use. Here is a link to a guy that printed his own case.

Here is an alternative case to print> Case.pdf

Here is a Visio version of the case so you can customise it to your hearts content> Caintech Visio Case

Send me in some of you pictures and I’ll post the best one

 

Believe it or not, there are several distributions of Linux intended for use by children as young as 3 years old. Child-oriented Linux distros tend to have a simplified interface with large, “chunky”, colorful icons and a specialized set of programs designed with kids in mind. Some of the better-known distributions aimed at children include:

  • Sugar, the operating system designed for the One Laptop Per Child project. Sugar is a radical departure from traditional desktops, with a strong emphasis on teaching programming skills, but is very strongly geared towards classroom use. Although I’m pretty comfortable using Linux, I’m afraid Sugar might be too different for me to help my nephew and niece make use of it.
  • Edubuntu is based on the popular Ubuntu distribution. Designed to be easy to install and very Windows-like in its operation, Edubuntu would be my first choice if I were using newer hardware. With its rich graphical interface, though, I worry that these years-old PCs, neither of which have graphic cards, will lag running Edubuntu. And given kids’ attention spans, I’m afraid that would be a major barrier to getting them to use it.
  • LinuxKidX uses a KDE-based desktop highly customized for children, and is based on the Slackware distro. The only drawback for me is that most of the support material is in Portuguese (although the distro I linked to is in English), making it hard for me to be confident about my ability to help if there are any problems.
  • Foresight for Kids is based on Foresight Linux, a distro distinguished by the use of the Conary package manager. Conary is intended to make updates and dependencies much easier to manage than other package managers – in English, it should be easier to install and update software.  On the other hand, finding software packaged for the Conary installer might be a challenge, though I expect the most popular programs are being adapted by the Foresight team.
  • Qimo is another system based on Ubuntu, but designed to be used by a single home user instead of in classroom instruction. The system requirements are fairly low, since it’s designed to be run on donated equipment which Qimo’s parent organization, QuinnCo, distributes to needy kids.

Given the low specs of the equipment I”m working with, Qimo seems idea for me, but since most of these will run from either a Live CD or a USB memory key, there’s no reason not to download them all and give each a try to see what you – and, more importantly, your kids – like best.

Linux Software for Kids

In addition to the kid-friendly interface, all of the distributions above come with an assortment of software that’s either designed especially for kids or has special appeal for kids. This includes specifically educational software intended to teach math, typing, art, or even computer programming; typical productivity applications like word processors and graphics programs; and, of course, games. Of course, Linux doesn’t have nearly the range of games that are available for Windows PCs, but my thinking is, the games are good enough for younger kids, and older kids will gravitate towards consoles (my brother and sister-in-law have a Wii).

Some of the software available for kids includes:

  • GCompris, a set of over 100 educational games intended to teach everything from basic computer use to reading, art history, telling time, and vector drawing.
  • Childsplay is another collection of games, with an emphasis on memory skills.
  • TuxPaint, an amazing drawing program filled with fun sound effects and neat effects.
  • EToys is a scripting environment, more or less. The idea is that kids solve problems by breaking them down into pieces, scripting them, and running their scripts – the same way programmers do. But the goal doesn’t seem to be to teach programming but rather to provide an immersive learning environment in which kids learn foundational thinking skills.
  • SuperTux and Secret Maryo are Super Mario clones, because kids love Super Mario. You already know that.
  • TomBoy, a wiki-like note-taking program.
  • TuxTyping, a typing game intended to help develop basic typing skills.
  • Kalzium is a guide to the periodic table and a database of information about chemistry and the elements. Great for older students.
  • Atomix, a cool little game where kids build molecules out of atoms.
  • Tux of Math Command is an arcade game that helps develop math skills.

Not all distros come with all of these games, but they are easy enough to install from the online repositories if your chosen distro doesn’t come with one or more of them. Of course, most distros also come with standard Linux programs like OpenOffice.org (an Office-like suite of productivity apps), AbiWord (a Word-like word processor), GIMP (a powerful image editor), Pidgin (a multi-account IM client), and Firefox.

Linux is a complex operating system, but it’s also a highly customizable one – for kids, that means a system that can grow as they do and a powerful learning environment. Of course, children’s computer use should not be totally unsupervised – any kid can stumble across Web content that might be pretty uncomfortable for mom and dad to have to explain – but kids should have a chance to explore the possibilities of today’s technology and get their hands dirty, like kids do. And worst-case scenario – your 6-year old borks the operating system and you re-install. Wouldn’t you rather it was on the Edubuntu system, rather than on your mission-critical work PC? (Make sure you back up the /home directory regularly so you don’t lose all your kids’ drawings, poems, stories, or whatever.)

 

So Christmas is creeping up on us slowly but surly again and if you are stuck on what to but for the geek in your life I have compiled a list of some of the best geek/tech books around. All of the following books can are available on the new Amazon Kindle

Windows 7 Annoyances (Page 460)
by David A. Karp
Published 2010
O’Reilly Media, Inc
ISBN: 0596157622

IT Security Management (Page 238)
by Alberto Partida, Diego Andina
Published 2010
Springer
ISBN: 9048188814

Stealing the network: the complete series collector’s edition (Page 453)
By Ryan Russell, Johnny Long, Timothy Mullen
Published 2009
Syngress
ISBN: 159749299X

Security Awareness: Applying Practical Security in Your World (Page 66)
By Mark Ciampa
Published 2009
Cengage Learning
ISBN 1435454146

Security+ Guide to Network Security Fundamentals (Page 72)
by Mark Ciampa
Published 2008
Course Technology
ISBN: 1428340661

Kismet Hacking (Page 227)
by Brad Haines and Frank Thornton
Published 2008
Syngress
ISBN:1597491179

Security Power Tools (Page 100)
by Bryan Burns, Jennifer Granick, Jennifer Stisa Granick, Steve Manzuik, Paul Guersch, Dave Killion, Nicolas Beauchesne, Eric Moret, Julien Sobrier, Michael Lynn, Eric Markham, Chris Iezzoni, Philippe Biondi
Published 2007
O’Reilly
ISBN:0596009631

Windows Vista Annoyances (Page 371)
by David A. Karp
Published 2008
O’Reilly
ISBN:0596527624

Stealing the Network: How to Own a Shadow (Page 268)
by Johnny Long, Timothy Mullen, Ryan Russell, Scott Pinzon
Published 2007
Syngress
ISBN:1597490814

Z4ck (Page 187)
by Kevin Milne
Published 2004
PageFree Publishing, Inc
ISBN:1589613120

The Art of Intrusion: The Real Stories Behind the Exploits of Hackers, Intruders and Deceivers (270 pages)
by Kevin D. Mitnick
Published 2005
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN:0764569597

CBS has just posted a new app to the Apple App Store that turns your iPhone into a Star Trek communicator. You can flip the communicator open by flipping the phone and it includes all sorts of Original Series sound effects. Even cooler there is a phone app included, which can access your contacts, so you can make calls right from the communicator.

Right now it’s a bit pricey at $1.99, but if you’re a hardcore Trekkie/Trekker with an iPhone and just can’t live without it; you can get it here.