Posts Tagged ‘passwords’

he windows passwords can be accessed in a number of different ways. The most common way would be via accessing the Security Accounts Manager (SAM) file and obtaining the system passwords in their hashed form with a number of different tools. Alternatively passwords can be read from memory which has the added benefit of recovering the passwords in plain text and avoiding the cracking requirement. In order to understand the formats you’ll see when dumping Windows system hashes a brief overview of the different storage formats is required.

Lan Manager (LM) Hashes
Originally windows passwords shorter than 15 characters were stored in the Lan Manager (LM) hash format. Some OSes such as Windows 2000, XP and Server 2003 continue to use these hashes unless disabled. Occasionally an OS like Vista may store the LM hash for backwards compatibility with other systems. Due to numerous reasons this hash is simply terrible. It includes several poor design decisions from Microsoft such as splitting the password into two blocks and allowing each to be cracked independently. Through the use of rainbow tables which will be explained later it’s trivial to crack a password stored in a LM hash regardless of complexity. This hash is then stored with the same password calculated in the NT hash format in the following format: ::::::

An example of a dumped NTLM hash with the LM ant NT component. Administrator:500:611D6F6E763B902934544489FCC9192B:B71ED1E7F2B60ED5A2EDD28379D45C91:::

NT Hashes
Newer Windows operating systems use the NT hash. In simple terms there is no significant weakness in this hash that sets it apart from any other cryptographic hash function. Cracking methods such as brute force, rainbow tables or word lists are required to recover the password if it’s only stored in the NT format.

An example of a dumped NTLM hash with only the NT component (as seen on newer systems.
Administrator:500:NO PASSWORD*********************:EC054D40119570A46634350291AF0F72:::

It’s worth noting the “no password” string is variable based on the tool. Others may present this information as padded zeros, or commonly you may see the string “AAD3B435B51404EEAAD3B435B51404EE” in place of no password. This signifies that the LM hash is empty and not stored.

Location
The hashes are located in the Windows\System32\config directory using both the SAM and SYSTEM files. In addition it’s also located in the registry file HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SAM which cannot be accessed during run time. Finally backup copies can be often found in Windows\Repair.

Tool – PwDump7 – http://www.tarasco.org/security/pwdump_7/
This tool can be executed on the system machine to recover the system hashes. Simply download the run the binary with at least administrator account privileges.

Tool – Windows Credential Editor – http://www.ampliasecurity.com/
Windows Credentials Editor (WCE) is great for dumping passwords that are in memory. Personally I typically use it with the -w flag to dump passwords in clear text. This can often net you passwords that are infeasible to get any other way.

Tool – Meterpreter
If you have a meterpreter shell on the system, often you can get the hashes by calling the hashdump command.

Method – Recovery Directory
Occasionally you may not have direct access to the file required, or perhaps even command line interaction with the victim. An example of this would be a local file inclusion attack on a web service. In those cases it’s recommended you try and recover the SYSTEM and SAM directories located in the Windows\Repair directory.

Method – Live CD
Sometimes you may have physical access to the computer but wish to dump the passwords for cracking later. Using a Live CD is a common method of being able to mount the Windows drive and recover the SYSTEM and SAM files from the System32/config directory since the OS isn’t preventing you access.

 

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Johnny is the cross-platform Open Source GUI frontend for the popular password cracker John the Ripper. It was originally proposed and designed by Shinnok in draft, version 1.0 implementation was achieved by Aleksey Cherepanov as part of GSoC 2012 and Mathieu Laprise took Johnny further towards 2.0 and beyond as part of GSoC 2015.

Johnny’s aim is to automate and simplify the password cracking routine with the help of the tremendously versatile and robust John the Ripper, as well as add extra functionality on top of it, specific to Desktop and GUI paradigms, like improved hash and password workflow, multiple attacks and session management, easily define complex attack rules, visual feedback and statistics, all of it on top of the immense capabilities and features offered by both JtR core/proper as well as jumbo.

Features

  • Cross platform, builds and runs on all major desktop platforms
  • Based on the most powerful and robust password cracking software, supports both John core/proper and jumbo flavors
  • Exposes most useful JtR attack modes and options in a usable, yet powerful interface
  • Simplifies password/hash management and attack results via complex filtering and selection
  • Easily define new attacks and practical multiple attack session management
  • Manually guess passwords via the Guess function
  • Export Passwords table to CSV and colon password file format
  • Import many types of encrypted or password protected files via the 2john functionality
  • Fully translatable (English and French language for now)

Download

tv crime2From the moment people started using passwords, it didn’t take long to realize how many people picked the very same passwords over and over. Even the way people misspell words is consistent. In fact, people are so predictable that most hackers make use of lists of common passwords just like these. To give you some insight into how predictable humans are, the following is a list of the 500 most common passwords. If you see your password on this list, please change it immediately. Keep in mind that every password listed here has been used by at least hundreds if not thousands of other people.

There are some interesting passwords on this list that show how people try to be clever, but even human cleverness is predictable. For example, look at these passwords that I found interesting:

ncc1701 The ship number for the Starship Enterprise
thx1138 The name of George Lucas’s first movie, a 1971 remake of an earlier student project
qazwsx Follows a simple pattern when typed on a typical keyboard
666666 Six sixes
7777777 Seven sevens
ou812 The title of a 1988 Van Halen album
8675309 The number mentioned in the 1982 Tommy Tutone song. The song supposedly caused an epidemic of people dialing 867- 5309 and asking for “Jenny”

“…Approximately one out of every nine people uses at least one password on the list shown in table below. One out of every 50 people uses one of the top 20 worst passwords..”

Lists the top 500 worst passwords of all time, not considering character case. Don’t blame me for the offensive words; you were the ones who picked these, not me.

NO Top 1-100 Top 101–200 Top 201–300 Top 301–400 Top 401–500
1 123456 porsche firebird prince rosebud
2 password guitar butter beach jaguar
3 12345678 chelsea united amateur great
4 1234 black turtle 7777777 cool
5 pussy diamond steelers muffin cooper
6 12345 nascar tiffany redsox 1313
7 dragon jackson zxcvbn star scorpio
8 qwerty cameron tomcat testing mountain
9 696969 654321 golf shannon madison
10 mustang computer bond007 murphy 987654
11 letmein amanda bear frank brazil
12 baseball wizard tiger hannah lauren
13 master xxxxxxxx doctor dave japan
14 michael money gateway eagle1 naked
15 football phoenix gators 11111 squirt
16 shadow mickey angel mother stars
17 monkey bailey junior nathan apple
18 abc123 knight thx1138 raiders alexis
19 pass iceman porno steve aaaa
20 fuckme tigers badboy forever bonnie
21 6969 purple debbie angela peaches
22 jordan andrea spider viper jasmine
23 harley horny melissa ou812 kevin
24 ranger dakota booger jake matt
25 iwantu aaaaaa 1212 lovers qwertyui
26 jennifer player flyers suckit danielle
27 hunter sunshine fish gregory beaver
28 fuck morgan porn buddy 4321
29 2000 starwars matrix whatever 4128
30 test boomer teens young runner
31 batman cowboys scooby nicholas swimming
32 trustno1 edward jason lucky dolphin
33 thomas charles walter helpme gordon
34 tigger girls cumshot jackie casper
35 robert booboo boston monica stupid
36 access coffee braves midnight shit
37 love xxxxxx yankee college saturn
38 buster bulldog lover baby gemini
39 1234567 ncc1701 barney cunt apples
40 soccer rabbit victor brian august
41 hockey peanut tucker mark 3333
42 killer john princess startrek canada
43 george johnny mercedes sierra blazer
44 sexy gandalf 5150 leather cumming
45 andrew spanky doggie 232323 hunting
46 charlie winter zzzzzz 4444 kitty
47 superman brandy gunner beavis rainbow
48 asshole compaq horney bigcock 112233
49 fuckyou carlos bubba happy arthur
50 dallas tennis 2112 sophie cream
51 jessica james fred ladies calvin
52 panties mike johnson naughty shaved
53 pepper brandon xxxxx giants surfer
54 1111 fender tits booty samson
55 austin anthony member blonde kelly
56 william blowme boobs fucked paul
57 daniel ferrari donald golden mine
58 golfer cookie bigdaddy 0 king
59 summer chicken bronco fire racing
60 heather maverick penis sandra 5555
61 hammer chicago voyager pookie eagle
62 yankees joseph rangers packers hentai
63 joshua diablo birdie einstein newyork
64 maggie sexsex trouble dolphins little
65 biteme hardcore white 0 redwings
66 enter 666666 topgun chevy smith
67 ashley willie bigtits winston sticky
68 thunder welcome bitches warrior cocacola
69 cowboy chris green sammy animal
70 silver panther super slut broncos
71 richard yamaha qazwsx 8675309 private
72 fucker justin magic zxcvbnm skippy
73 orange banana lakers nipples marvin
74 merlin driver rachel power blondes
75 michelle marine slayer victoria enjoy
76 corvette angels scott asdfgh girl
77 bigdog fishing 2222 vagina apollo
78 cheese david asdf toyota parker
79 matthew maddog video travis qwert
80 121212 hooters london hotdog time
81 patrick wilson 7777 paris sydney
82 martin butthead marlboro rock women
83 freedom dennis srinivas xxxx voodoo
84 ginger fucking internet extreme magnum
85 blowjob captain action redskins juice
86 nicole bigdick carter erotic abgrtyu
87 sparky chester jasper dirty 777777
88 yellow smokey monster ford dreams
89 camaro xavier teresa freddy maxwell
90 secret steven jeremy arsenal music
91 dick viking 11111111 access14 rush2112
92 falcon snoopy bill wolf russia
93 taylor blue crystal nipple scorpion
94 111111 eagles peter iloveyou rebecca
95 131313 winner pussies alex tester
96 123123 samantha cock florida mistress
97 bitch house beer eric phantom
98 hello miller rocket legend billy
99 scooter flower theman movie 6666
100 please jack oliver success albert

TV failure

It’s 2015 and it would be nice to think that people had learned what makes a good password by now. They haven’t. And this list of the 25 most popular passwords of 2014—maybe also make that the worst—proves it.

SplashData’s annual list compiles the millions of stolen passwords made public throughout the year and assembles them in order of popularity. A glance down the list reveals that we’re all still morons, with “123456”, “password”, “12345”, “12345678” and “qwerty” making up the top five. No, really.

Now is clearly a good time to remind yourself not to be one of those morons, and start using sensible passwords, LastPass or some other system to keep your personal information safe. But anyway, enough of that, here’s the list. You’re welcome.
1. 123456 (Unchanged)

2. password (Unchanged)

3. 12345 (Up 17)

4. 12345678 (Down 1)

5. qwerty (Down 1)

6. 123456789 (Unchanged)

7. 1234 (Up 9)

8. baseball (New)

9. dragon (New)

10. football (New)

11. 1234567 (Down 4)

12. monkey (Up 5)

13. letmein (Up 1)

14. abc123 (Down 9)

15. 111111 (Down 8)

16.mustang (New)

17. access (New)

18. shadow (Unchanged)

19. master (New)

20. michael (New)

21. superman (New)

22. 696969 (New)

23. 123123 (Down 12)

24. batman (New)

25. trustno1 (Down 1)

 

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There are a large number of websites and programs that prompt end users to save passwords on their personal computer(s). Popular web browsers such as Mozilla Firefox, Internet Explorer, Google Chrome, and instant messaging software like Windows Live Messenger are capable of saving user logins and passwords on the local computer. A common task that arises for the end-user is to find stored passwords on a computer in order to recover lost or forgotten access information. Depending on the application being used, operating system, and specific user permissions, the task can be as easy as choosing some options in the OS or having to download specific tools to crack the password file hash.

How to Find Stored Passwords in Windows XP

Microsoft Windows has the capability to manage stored user names and passwords for individual users so unique software may not be required for this purpose.

Step 1 – Click on the “Start” menu button and launch the “Control Panel”.

Step 2 – Locate the “Pick a category” menu label the select “User Accounts” menu option.

Step 3 – Open the “Stored User Names and Passwords” menu option by selecting “Manage my network passwords” beneath the “Related Tasks” menu label. If you are logged in as an administrator, select your user account. Then under related tasks choose the “Manage my network passwords.”

Step 4 – View the list of stored usernames and passwords.

How to Find Stored Passwords in Windows 7

Step 1 – Click on the “Start” menu button and launch “Control Panel”.

Step 2 – Click on “User Accounts and Family Safety”, then on “User Accounts”

Step 3 – In the left pane, click “Manage your network passwords”.

How to Find Stored Passwords in Windows 8

Step 1 – Click on the “Start” menu button and launch “Control Panel”.

Step 2 – Click on “User Accounts and Family Safety”, then on “Credential Manager”

How to View Stored Passwords on a MAC

On computers than run the Mac OS X operating system, when a user tells their computer to store a password associated with an application, website, or wireless network, the information is saved on the computer’s hard drive. OS X uses the Keychain Access utility to help Mac users to look-up and manage their stored passwords.

Step 1 – Launch the OS X “Finder” by clicking the menu icon on the computer’s dock. Then, navigate to the “Utilities” folder which is located under the “Applications” section on the Mac hard drive.

Step 2 – Open the “Keychain Access” program icon to launch the password utility application. Then, select “Passwords” from the options located in the lower left corner of the program window.

Step 3 – From the list find the application, web site or network name associated with the password you want to view and double click on it. A new window showing information about it will display.

Step 4 – Click on the “Show password” checkbox to reveal the password. You will be asked to enter your user password, and click “Allow”, in order to see it. Once you do it will be visible in the “Show password” field.

How to Find Stored Passwords in Firefox

The Mozilla FireFox Password Manager application stores user names and passwords on your computer’s hard drive and will automatically enter the data when visiting websites that require the information.

Steps to Use the Mozilla FireFox Password Manager

Step 1 – Launch Mozilla Firefox by double clicking the program icon on your computer’s desktop.

Step 2 – Select the “FireFox” menu button and then click the “Options” menu choice.

Step 3 – Select the “Security” menu tab that is located at the upper portion of the “Options” window.

Step 4 – Select the “Remember Passwords for Sites” check box if not already selected.

Step 5 – Log into a website that requires a username and password. Choose the “Remember” menu button on the subsequently displayed dialog box to save a new password in the FireFox Password Manager. Alternatively, you can choose the “Never for This Site” menu option to add an exception to the Password manger.

Step 6 – Choose the “Exceptions” menu button in FireFox to view the current exception list that the web browser is configured to never save a password. Sites can be removed from this list by clicking the “Remove All” menu button (removes all exceptions) or individually by selecting a site and choosing the “Remove” button.

Step 7 – View the saved passwords in the Password Manager by selecting the “Saved Passwords” menu button. You can also remove passwords from this window by clicking the “Remove All” or “Remove” menu buttons.

Steps to Change the FireFox Password Manager Master Password

The FireFox master password is used to protect the master key for the FireFox browser on your computer. The master key is used to encrypt email passwords, web site passwords, and other potentially sensitive information stored by the Form and Password Manager on your computer.

Step 1 – Launch Mozilla FireFox by double clicking the program icon.

Step 2 – Select the “FireFox” menu button, then click the “Options” menu choice, and choose the “Security” tab.

Step 3 – If the “Use a master password” checkbox is not selected you don’t have a master password. If it is selected then click on the “Change Master Password” button.

Step 4 – Enter your current password, and then in the fields below enter and re-enter the new password you wish to set.

How to Recover Passwords Hidden Behind Asterisks

A common problem that arises for end-users is determining what passwords are saved by their web browser if they do not have access to the Password Manager or equivalent application on their computer. The BulletsPassView utility is one of the most used freeware applications capable of performing this task. The program is a tool that is designed to reveal the passwords stored behind the asterisks in the standard password text box on the Windows operating system and Internet Explorer web browsers.

Improvements made to the BulletsPassView application from the legacy Asterisk Logger utility include support for Windows 7/8/Vista, support for Internet Explorer password text boxes, improved command line support, Unicode support to properly capture non-English language passwords, and not revealing the password inside of the password text-box itself (inside of the main window of the application only). The new version of BulletsPassView does have limitations; however, as it is not able to retrieve passwords displayed in the Chrome, FireFox, or Opera web browsers as well as the network and dial-up passwords on Windows. This is due to the fact that these applications do not save the password stored behind the asterisks to improve security.

Steps to Use BulletsPassView

Step 1 – Download the appropriate version of BulletsPassView for your computer. Please note that if you are using a 64 bit Windows computer there is a different version of the software than for 32 bit computers. You can tell if your Windows computer is a 64 bit by selecting “Start,” “Control Panel,” and “System” menu options and the OS type will be listed about half-way down the subsequently displayed screen.

Step 2 – Double-click the executable file downloaded to launch the application. The BulletsPassView program does not require an installation process. On launch, the program will make a first scan to locate any password text-boxes actively displayed and show the result on the program’s main window.

Step 3 – Open a website in Internet Explorer that has a password saved which you need to recover. Then click the “Refresh” menu button on BulletsPassView or press the “F5” key on your computer to display the password. Alternatively, the application supports an “Auto Refresh” option that is selectable under the “Options” menu to automatically scan for new passwords every few minutes.

Step 4 – Open the Windows command prompt by selecting the “Start” menu button and entering “CMD” in the search text field. Then, enter the fully qualified path to the BulletsPassView application and include “/stext <Filename>” followed by pressing the “Enter” key. This will save the list of passwords currently displayed on the computer’s screen to save the information in a simple text file.

BulletsPassView Command Line Options

BulletsPassView supports a number of command line options to save on-screen data into a number of formats to include text, XML, HTML, CSV.

/stext <Filename>       Save the list of bullet passwords into simple text file.

/stab <Filename>         Save the list of bullet passwords into a tab-delimited text file.

/scomma <Filename> Save the list of bullet passwords into a comma-delimited text file (csv).

/stabular <Filename>   Save the list of bullet passwords into a tabular text file.

/shtml <Filename>      Save the list of bullet passwords into HTML file (Horizontal).

/sverhtml <Filename>  Save the list of bullet passwords into HTML file (Vertical).

/sxml <Filename>        Save the list of bullet passwords into XML file.

 

Find Stored Passwords Using Cain & Abel

Cain & Abel is able to disclose or recover stored passwords on computers using the Windows operating system (OS). The application is distributed as freeware and includes the capability to conduct password-box revealing, network sniffing, brute-force, and dictionary attacks. The application does not exploit software bugs or vulnerabilities to ensure a higher quality of service. The primary purpose of the software is to simplify the recovery of passwords and credentials for network administrators, security professionals, and security software vendors. The current version of the software is faster than previous versions and provides support for encrypted protocols such as SSH-1 and HTTPS.

Find Stored Passwords in ZIP Files Using ALZip

ALZip is freeware produced by ESTSoft and is designed to recover lost or forgotten passwords from ZIP files. ALZip allows end-users to compress, uncompress, and recover lost passwords for zip file archives. The application has a “Password Recovery” menu option that when selected will recover the lost information for the end-user.

Other Popular Password Recovery Tools

Some of the other popular password recovery tools found are the freeware utilities produced by NirSoftFreeware, Ultimate ZIP Cracker, and the Password Recovery Tool for MS Access 1.

NirSoftFreeware has a number of handy freeware utilities for recovering lost passwords from IE, Outlook, and various Instant Messaging clients.

Ultimate ZIP Cracker (shareware from VDGSoftware) recovers passwords from ZIP, ARJ, MS Word, and MS Excel formats. The program supports Brute Force attacks, Smart, Dictionary, Date, and Customized searches when recovering passwords associated with the supported file formats.

Password Recovery Tool for MS Access 1 (from Hongxin Technology & Trade) is a free tool to recover MS Access passwords. The application provides support for MS Access database files through the 2003 version. The ability to recover passwords for newer versions of Access is not stated to be supported.

This article was posted on onemansblog.com by John Pozadzides

If you invited me to try and crack your password, you know the one that you use over and over for like every web page you visit, how many guesses would it take before I got it?

Let’s see… here is my top 10 list. I can obtain most of this information much easier than you think, then I might just be able to get into your e-mail, computer, or online banking. After all, if I get into one I’ll probably get into all of them.

  1. Your partner, child, or pet’s name, possibly followed by a 0 or 1 (because they’re always making you use a number, aren’t they?)
  2. The last 4 digits of your social security number.
  3. 123 or 1234 or 123456.
  4. “password”
  5. Your city, or college, football team name.
  6. Date of birth – yours, your partner’s or your child’s.
  7. “god”
  8. “letmein”
  9. “money”
  10. “love”

Statistically speaking that should probably cover about 20% of you. But don’t worry. If I didn’t get it yet it will probably only take a few more minutes before I do…

Hackers, and I’m not talking about the ethical kind, have developed a whole range of tools to get at your personal data. And the main impediment standing between your information remaining safe, or leaking out, is the password you choose. (Ironically, the best protection people have is usually the one they take least seriously.)

One of the simplest ways to gain access to your information is through the use of a Brute Force Attack. This is accomplished when a hacker uses a specially written piece of software to attempt to log into a site using your credentials. Insecure.org has a list of the Top 10 FREE Password Crackers right here.

So, how would one use this process to actually breach your personal security? Simple. Follow my logic:

  • You probably use the same password for lots of stuff right?
  • Some sites you access such as your Bank or work VPN probably have pretty decent security, so I’m not going to attack them.
  • However, other sites like the Hallmark e-mail greeting cards site, an online forum you frequent, or an e-commerce site you’ve shopped at might not be as well prepared. So those are the ones I’d work on.
  • So, all we have to do now is unleash Brutus, wwwhack, or THC Hydra on their server with instructions to try say 10,000 (or 100,000 – whatever makes you happy) different usernames and passwords as fast as possible.
  • Once we’ve got several login+password pairings we can then go back and test them on targeted sites.
  • But wait… How do I know which bank you use and what your login ID is for the sites you frequent? All those cookies are simply stored, unencrypted and nicely named, in your Web browser’s cache. (Read this post to remedy that problem.)

And how fast could this be done? Well, that depends on three main things, the length and complexity of your password, the speed of the hacker’s computer, and the speed of the hacker’s Internet connection.

Assuming the hacker has a reasonably fast connection and PC here is an estimate of the amount of time it would take to generate every possible combination of passwords for a given number of characters. After generating the list it’s just a matter of time before the computer runs through all the possibilities – or gets shut down trying.

Pay particular attention to the difference between using only lowercase characters and using all possible characters (uppercase, lowercase, and special characters – like @#$%^&*). Adding just one capital letter and one asterisk would change the processing time for an 8 character password from 2.4 days to 2.1 centuries.

Password Length All Characters Only Lowercase
3 characters
4 characters
5 characters
6 characters
7 characters
8 characters
9 characters
10 characters
11 characters
12 characters
13 characters
14 characters
0.86 seconds
1.36 minutes
2.15 hours
8.51 days
2.21 years
2.10 centuries
20 millennia
1,899 millennia
180,365 millennia
17,184,705 millennia
1,627,797,068 millennia
154,640,721,434 millennia
0.02 seconds
.046 seconds
11.9 seconds
5.15 minutes
2.23 hours
2.42 days
2.07 months
4.48 years
1.16 centuries
3.03 millennia
78.7 millennia
2,046 millennia

Remember, these are just for an average computer, and these assume you aren’t using any word in the dictionary. If Google put their computer to work on it they’d finish about 1,000 times faster.

Now, I could go on for hours and hours more about all sorts of ways to compromise your security and generally make your life miserable – but 95% of those methods begin with compromising your weak password. So, why not just protect yourself from the start and sleep better at night?

Believe me, I understand the need to choose passwords that are memorable. But if you’re going to do that how about using something that no one is ever going to guess AND doesn’t contain any common word or phrase in it.

Here are some password tips:

  1. Randomly substitute numbers for letters that look similar. The letter ‘o’ becomes the number ’0′, or even better an ‘@’ or ‘*’. (i.e. – m0d3ltf0rd… like modelTford)
  2. Randomly throw in capital letters (i.e. – Mod3lTF0rd)
  3. Think of something you were attached to when you were younger, but DON’T CHOOSE A PERSON’S NAME! Every name plus every word in the dictionary will fail under a simple brute force attack.
  4. Maybe a place you loved, or a specific car, an attraction from a vacation, or a favorite restaurant?
  5. You really need to have different username / password combinations for everything. Remember, the technique is to break into anything you access just to figure out your standard password, then compromise everything else. This doesn’t work if you don’t use the same password everywhere.
  6. Since it can be difficult to remember a ton of passwords, I recommend using Roboform for Windows users. It will store all of your passwords in an encrypted format and allow you to use just one master password to access all of them. It will also automatically fill in forms on Web pages, and you can even get versions that allow you to take your password list with you on your PDA, phone or a USB key. If you’d like to download it without having to navigate their web site here is the direct download link.
  7. Mac users can use 1Password. It is essentially the same thing as Roboform, except for Mac, and they even have an iPhone application so you can take them with you too.
  8. Once you’ve thought of a password, try Microsoft’s password strength tester to find out how secure it is.

By request I also created a short RoboForm Tutorial. Hope it helps…

Another thing to keep in mind is that some of the passwords you think matter least actually matter most. For example, some people think that the password to their e-mail box isn’t important because “I don’t get anything sensitive there.” Well, that e-mail box is probably connected to your online banking account. If I can compromise it then I can log into the Bank’s Web site and tell it I’ve forgotten my password to have it e-mailed to me. Now, what were you saying about it not being important?

Often times people also reason that all of their passwords and logins are stored on their computer at home, which is save behind a router or firewall device. Of course, they’ve never bothered to change the default password on that device, so someone could drive up and park near the house, use a laptop to breach the wireless network and then try passwords from this list until they gain control of your network – after which time they will own you!

Now I realize that every day we encounter people who over-exaggerate points in order to move us to action, but trust me this is not one of those times. There are 50 other ways you can be compromised and punished for using weak passwords that I haven’t even mentioned.

I also realize that most people just don’t care about all this until it’s too late and they’ve learned a very hard lesson. But why don’t you do me, and yourself, a favor and take a little action to strengthen your passwords and let me know that all the time I spent on this article wasn’t completely in vain.

If you liked John’s post you can listen to an interview with him on Connecticut Public Radio > HERE

If you’ve ever forgotten your password or been asked to assist somebody else in resetting their password, there’s a lot of different ways to accomplish it. Here’s how to do it by hacking the Sticky Keys feature.

Over at the 4sysops blog, they’ve written up the process of resetting your Windows password by booting off a repair disk, opening a command prompt, and copying cmd.exe over top of sethc.exe. Once you’ve done that, you can boot back up into Windows until you get to the login prompt, press the Shift key 5 times, and you’ll see a command prompt where you can use the net user command to reset the password.

If the system already has the Sticky Keys feature disabled, or you don’t feel like copying files around, you can use an Ubuntu Live CD to reset your Windows password instead.

For more Windows 7 articles go to howtogeek.com